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The Food Allergy Superheroes Training (FAST) Program

Study Purpose

Among children with a food allergy, strict avoidance (e.g., elimination of allergenic foods from one's diet) is the only intervention capable of preventing potentially devastating health-related sequelae including anaphylaxis and death. Youths from low-income backgrounds are particularly impacted by food allergies and may be the population most apt to benefit from a brief, portable, and engaging skills-based intervention designed to teach young children the skills needed to remain adherent to food allergy safety guidelines. Data collected as part of the proposed project will lay the groundwork for a line of federally-funded intervention research broadly examining how to promote adherence to food allergy safety guidelines among young children from low-income backgrounds through implementation of a robust, efficient, and portable intervention.

Recruitment Criteria

Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Healthy volunteers are participants who do not have a disease or condition, or related conditions or symptoms

No
Study Type

An interventional clinical study is where participants are assigned to receive one or more interventions (or no intervention) so that researchers can evaluate the effects of the interventions on biomedical or health-related outcomes.


An observational clinical study is where participants identified as belonging to study groups are assessed for biomedical or health outcomes.


Searching Both is inclusive of interventional and observational studies.

Interventional
Eligible Ages 6 Years - 8 Years
Gender All
More Inclusion & Exclusion Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • - 6-8 years of age.
  • - Demonstrates a food allergy, based upon parent-report and confirmed diagnosis.
  • - Family considered low-income (income-to-needs ratio <200% of Department of Health and Human Services Federal Poverty Threshold) - English as child's primary language.
  • - One English-speaking parent/guardian.

Exclusion Criteria:

• Neurodevelopmental disorder (i.e., autism spectrum disorder), cognitive delays, or psychiatric disorder, based upon parent-report.

Trial Details

Trial ID:

This trial id was obtained from ClinicalTrials.gov, a service of the U.S. National Institutes of Health, providing information on publicly and privately supported clinical studies of human participants with locations in all 50 States and in 196 countries.

NCT04400214
Phase

Phase 1: Studies that emphasize safety and how the drug is metabolized and excreted in humans.

Phase 2: Studies that gather preliminary data on effectiveness (whether the drug works in people who have a certain disease or condition) and additional safety data.

Phase 3: Studies that gather more information about safety and effectiveness by studying different populations and different dosages and by using the drug in combination with other drugs.

Phase 4: Studies occurring after FDA has approved a drug for marketing, efficacy, or optimal use.

N/A
Lead Sponsor

The sponsor is the organization or person who oversees the clinical study and is responsible for analyzing the study data.

Kent State University
Principal Investigator

The person who is responsible for the scientific and technical direction of the entire clinical study.

N/A
Principal Investigator Affiliation N/A
Agency Class

Category of organization(s) involved as sponsor (and collaborator) supporting the trial.

OtherOtherOther
Overall Status Recruiting
Countries United States
Conditions

The disease, disorder, syndrome, illness, or injury that is being studied.

Allergy;Food, Adherence, Treatment, Child, Only
Study Website: View Trial Website
Additional Details

The primary aim of this R21 proposal is to test the efficacy of a 5-session intervention designed to increase adherence to FA safety guidelines among low-income, young children (6-8 years of age) with FAs. This intervention, the Food Allergy Superheroes Training (FAST) Program, will be developed and refined across Phases 1a and 1b to target skills beneficial to promote adherence to FA guidelines (i.e., food avoidance). During Phase 1a, we will recruit a parent-child advisory board to aide in integrating principles of behavioral skills training within the FAST Program manual. We will then examine the initial acceptability and feasibility of the FAST Program in an open trial with 10 low-income, young children with FAs to further refine the intervention's content. During Phase 1b, we will randomize 50 young children with a FA who are from a low-income background to receive either the FAST Program or FA knowledge. We will employ developmentally relevant FA assessments (i.e., child-report, role-play, in situ) before, after, and one-month post-intervention as our primary outcomes. Aim 1: Determine feasibility and acceptability of the FAST intervention. We will evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of this intervention with 60 participants (n=10 in pilot trial [Phase 1a] and n=50 in a preliminary randomized trial [Phase 1b]). Aim 2: Estimate the effect size of the FAST intervention relative to FA knowledge alone. Adherence will be measured via a multi-modal, FA assessment including child-report, role-play, and in situ assessment. This form of naturalistic, FA assessment will be designed to measure the child's behavior (i.e., ingest food, touch or play with food, etc.) in a safe yet realistic manner. This study will contribute to the field's knowledge of efficacious interventions for promoting adherence among young children with FAs.

Arms & Interventions

Arms

Experimental: Food Allergy Superheroes Training (FAST) Program

Participants enrolled in this arm of the study will receive 5, 20 minutes skills training sessions designed to promote adherence to food allergy safety guidelines. These sessions will occur over the period of <2 weeks. All sessions will occur at the PIs laboratory or within the participant's home.

Active Comparator: Food Allergy Knowledge (FAK) Intervention

Participants enrolled in this arm of the study will receive 5, 20 minutes educational training sessions designed to increase knowledge pertaining to food allergies. These sessions will occur over the period of <2 weeks. All sessions will occur at the PIs laboratory or within the participant's home.

Interventions

Behavioral: - Food Allergy Superheroes Training (FAST) Program

The primary aim of the FAST intervention is to 1) increase the young child's understanding of food allergies (FA) and 2) promote-adherence to FA safety guidelines through active skills training. We will achieve this aim through the use of educational materials (session 1) and a developmentally-tailored skills training intervention (session 2-5). Core components embedded within each skill straining session include instructions, modeling, rehearsal, and reinforcement/corrective feedback. The young child and their parent/caregiver will be present for the entirety of all sessions; however, all intervention materials (i.e., educational content, skills training components) are designed with the young child as the primary focal point of interest. All children will be rewarded with a small toy (<$5 value) at the end of each successfully completed session.

Other: - Food Allergy Knowledge Intervention

The primary aim of the FAK intervention is to increase the young child's understanding of FAs including prevalence, symptoms, and management strategies among other topics. We will achieve this aim through the use of educational materials targeting knowledge acquisition through a variety of didactic materials made freely available through the Food Allergy Research Education (FARE) website (www.foodallergy.org). More specifically, we will employ information embedded within the "Food Allergy 101" segment of the FARE website. The young child and their parent/caregiver will be present for the entirety of all sessions; however, all intervention materials are designed with the young child as the primary focal point of interest. All children will be rewarded with a small toy (<$5 value) at the end of each successfully completed session. All FAK sessions will occur within the child's home and will include informational handouts relevant to the day's session.

Contact a Trial Team

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Kent State University, Kent, Ohio

Status

Recruiting

Address

Kent State University

Kent, Ohio, 44242

Site Contact

Christopher A Flessner, Ph.D.

cflessne@kent.edu

330-672-2236

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